• David Almeida - Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
    "A transdisciplinary study of human evolution and diversity not only helps us understand how and why we became who we are, it is necessary for determining how we function day-to-day. My research examines the effects of biological and self-reported indicators of daily stress on health. How we experience and respond to daily life challenges is intricately tied to the evolution of human diversity."
    David Almeida - Professor of Human Development and Family Studies
  • Eric Plutzer - Professor of Political Science
    "For problems ranging from infectious disease to racial tensions in American cities, understanding that evolution matters but that genes are not deterministic and differ in their effects depending on social behavior and environment is a powerful way to better understand and solve many human challenges. Interdisciplinary research holds great promise for using our knowledge of evolution effectively to improve the human condition."
    Eric Plutzer - Professor of Political Science
  • Peter Hatemi - Professor of Political Science
    "If we are to make any headway in fighting diseases, reducing inequalities and the internecine fighting that appears to emerge so endemically when resources are scarce, values differ, and political approaches conflict, we must utilize multiple approaches, methods, be transdisciplinary and take into account the nature of human diversity, at every level, from our genes to our social identifications."
    Peter Hatemi - Professor of Political Science
  • Heather Toomey Zimmerman - Associate Professor of Education
    “Bringing together multiple disciplines to understand how people learn and reason about complex topics such as human evolution is important for today’s schools, museums, and other educational settings. The Center offers multiple perspectives of how research in this area is conducted, which will enhance young people’s views of how scientific knowledge is developed and of human diversity.”
    Heather Toomey Zimmerman - Associate Professor of Education
  • Nina Jablonski – CHED Director and Evan Pugh Professor of Anthropology
    Human beings are products of rich and complex interactions between biology and culture that have developed over millions of years. Human evolutionary history informs our understanding of human behavior and culture, and vice versa. Examining only one side of this set of reciprocal interactions risks missing the plot entirely.
    Nina Jablonski – CHED Director and Evan Pugh Professor of Anthropology
  • Mark Shriver - Professor of Biological Anthropology
    "Our Center is important for two reasons: 1) There are many interesting questions yet to answer about human evolution and physical, behavioral, and genetic variation, and 2) There seems to be a continuing divide between what anthropologists know and how they think about human evolution and diversity and how the general public and academic colleagues in other fields think about these topics."
    Mark Shriver - Professor of Biological Anthropology
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CHED Seed Grants

CHED Seed Grants

RFP for FY 2016-2017

The Penn State Center for Human Evolution and Diversity (CHED) invites proposals for seed grants for multi- and transdisciplinary projects which address interesting, and even previously intractable, problems in the study of human biological or biocultural adaptation to the environment. Such problems may include those with clinical manifestations involving mismatches between modern humans and their environment. Approaches involving, but not restricted to, genomics, epigenetics, functional anatomy, experimental physiology, evolutionary developmental biology, experimental neurobiology, imaging, and/or survey research are sought. Successful applications will identify a specific problem or phenomenon in human evolutionary biology to be investigated, and a novel, transdisciplinary approach to studying it. Applications describing novel and risky, but defendable, methodological approaches are strongly welcomed. Two to three regular seed grants of up to $20,000 each will be made. A further one or two seed grants of up to $25,000 each will be made for projects involving an undergraduate student researcher. Applications are invited from multidisciplinary teams of Penn State researchers representing at least two Colleges and three departments. Applications consisting of a one-page summary (NSF-style, with separate headings for the overview, statement on the intellectual merit of the proposed activity, and statement on the broader impacts of the proposed activity), NSF-style biographical sketches of all co-investigators, a budget, and project timeline should be sent to Nina Jablonski (ngj2@psu.edu) on or before Friday 18 November 2016. Projects involving undergraduate research students should describe the role(s) the student would play in the project, and the anticipated benefit to the team and the student from student involvement. Final selection of projects for funding will be based on written applications and on brief presentations given to CHED-affiliated faculty during early December 2016.

 

 

Grant Recipients for FY 2015-2016

 

Are Human Sexually Dimorphic Traits Affected by Variation in Y-Chromosomal Ampliconic Gene Copy Number?

Evolution and Development of the Human Wrist

Exercise-Induced Developmental Plasticity of Musculoskeletal Form and Function

 

Grant RFP for FY 2015-2016


Request for Proposals from the Penn State Center for Human Evolution and Diversity (CHED)

The Penn State Center for Human Evolution and Diversity (CHED) is soliciting proposals for seed grants for multi- and transdisciplinary projects on the evolution of modern human behavioral and morphological diversity. Proposals for pilot projects and/or workshop meetings leading to external grant proposals are sought, specifically in the following interface areas:  1) studies combining bioinformatics and omics approaches in the study of human behavioral diversity, including studies of the effects of nutrition, violence, and social stress on gene expression and behavior through the life course; 2) integrative studies examining the genetic bases of human morphology, including evolutionary developmental biological and/or bioinformatics approaches; and 3) studies examining the relationships between nutrition, physical activity, and bone morphology, with emphasis on the functional interpretation of fossil remains. Three to four grants of up to $20,000 each will be made. Applications are invited from multidisciplinary teams of Penn State researchers representing at least two Colleges and three departments; the participation of external researchers in workshops is encouraged. Applications consisting of a one-page summary (NSF-style, with separate headings for the overview, statement on the intellectual merit of the proposed activity, and statement on the broader impacts of the proposed activity), NSF-style biographical sketches of all co-investigators, a budget, and project timeline should be sent to Nina Jablonski (ngj2@psu.edu) on or before Friday 9 October 2015.

Center for Human Evolution and Diversity

403C Carpenter Building, University Park, PA 16802

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